Arctic Route

Travel Time, two posts back, had it about right. Regulatory confidence in Boeing’s abilities to fly on two jet engines over the pole produced this flight path for us on Tuesday/Wednesday. The flight was Air China CA818 Dulles to Beijing, fourteen hours in a Boeing 777.

Never having seen Hudson Bay in mid-April, I’m here to testify that there’s not a thing down there, no sign of Churchill and polar bears, just icy patches with streams to the bay and snow fields beyond.

Washington Dulles to Beijing was followed by Beijing to HCMC where everybody is wilting after several 97 degree days.

Xinhua Tweet-Claims Chinese Democracy

Xhinua (@XHNews) has found an American willing to associate his credibility with this quote: “It is widely acknowledged that a key to China’s success is its system of democracy.”

Correction

A couple of posts in the last few months have referred to far western China’s Xinjiang province. Quotes: Life in Xinjiang, posted October 5th, quoted an article in The Diplomat titled The Uyghurs and the Han: 1 World, 2 Universes. The author, Ruth Ingram, has written to note that I used the word ‘Turkmen’ when I should have used the term ‘Turkic’ (see comments in that post). Duly noted, corrected in the post, and thanks to Ms. Ingram.

And on the subject of Xinjiang, in Weekend Reading a couple of weeks back, I recommended a long travelogue titled A Week In Xinjiang’s Absolute Surveillance State by Vadim Mikhailov. It’s thoroughly absorbing. I recommend it still.

(Map from Wikimedia)

Quotes: Life in Xinjiang

Many of us are generally aware there is a minority of mostly Muslim ethnic Turkic in far western China known as Uighurs (pronounced “Wee-gurs”), people more closely related to the population of the Central Asian ‘Stans than to the ruling Han Chinese.

Some will have read about recent and apparently massive, largely arbitrary incarceration of Uighurs in “re-education camps” under local Party Secretary Chen Quanguo. Chen’s previous post was the Tibetan capital Lhasa, where he presided over a spate of Tibetan Buddihst self-immolations under his remit to tame the Tibetan population.

I’ve only just now read some alarming reporting from Ruth Ingram about what life is like among the Xinjiang Uighurs. Some quotes:

“Uyghurs have to keep a notebook detailing visits by not only their friends and relatives, but those of neighbors in their street, the content of the conversations, and the time and date of arrival and departure.”

“They are forced to install satellite navigation in their cars and to install the special Jingwang Weishi app on their phones, which sends the police an identification number for the device, its model, and the telephone number of its owner before monitoring all the information that passes through the telephone, warning the user when it finds content that the government deems dangerous. Failure to carry your phone, refusal to use a smart phone, turning it off completely for long periods, or even restoring your phone to its factory settings can be deemed suspicious.”

“Children who have had both parents taken away are being brought up in state orphanages hurriedly being built for the purpose.”

“‘It’s impossible to tear out weeds one by one,’ said one party official in Kashgar. ‘We need chemicals that can deal with all of them at once.'”

Read the whole article in The Diplomat.

(Note: This post has been corrected to substitute the word ‘Turkic’ for the previously published ‘Turkmen’ in the first sentence.)

China Moves Its Cities Abroad

Beijing is not only buying Africa, now it’s building its own cities in other countries. Here, in Cambodia,

“Union Development Group (UDG), the Chinese developer behind Koh Kong province’s $3.8 billion tourism project called Dara Sakor, has unveiled plans for yet another project called “Tourism Vacation Town,”

an investment of an additional $1.2 billion dollars, while in Malaysia, a proposed new city of 700,000, the $100 billion Forest City project looks a lot like mainland China’s Shenzen, which is perched on the border with Hong Kong. Forest City would sit just across the Johor Strait from Singapore. It’s running into resistance from the Malaysian leadership, though. 93-year-old leader Mahathir Mohamad said this week

“that no foreigners would be allowed to live there even as crews rushed to complete some residential towers before buyers move in later this year.”

This Is Really Huge

Now under construction, the Daxing International Airport south of Beijing will supplant Beijing Capitol Airport with the first flight scheduled for October of next year.

Beijing hopes that Daxing can beat Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta in the US to become the world’s busiest airport in terms of passengers within a few years. Atlanta’s airport handled just under 104 million passengers in 2017, while the Beijing Capital International Airport was the runner-up with 95.8 million, according to the Airports Council International.

– from New Beijing airport aiming to be the world’s busiest in the Asia Times. Artist’s impression from the same article.