Our Staffs Are Very Good at Communicating in English

Got this from Frank last night:


Dear  Sir/Madam,

My name is Frank, I’m Operations Manager for TenDa Plastics CO., Limited. located in DongGuan City China . I am very glad to see your company web and writing to you to explore the possible cooperation with you .

TenDa Plastics is a professional moulds . injection molding .Assemble with Packaging manufacturer. Our products include UAV Parts. UAV Filter. automobile . Medical . household items. industrial. electrical appliances. Display. etc. we’ve won high reputation from our customers all over the world. if you want know more for our Company , please visit our website.

Our staffs are very good at Communicating in English.


 

Haluatko Lukea Jotain Mielenkiintoista?

It means something close to “Want to read something interesting?” This is my wobbly beginner’s Finnish.

Finnish is maybe not the easiest thing for speakers of the Latin group of languages to learn, as you can see by trying to decipher a random front page of the country’s biggest newspaper, the Hensingin Sanomat. Like this one from last week:

Finnish, spoken by about five million people, is a “Finno-Ugric” language, with vague origins in the Ural mountains. Have a look at this nice photo essay about Finno-Ugric people called In Search of Russia’s First Inhabitants.

Read This in Your Vafri

Department of admirable ideas: In Iceland, instead of borrowing words from English, when a new word is necessary they invent a new Icelandic word,

“rooted in the tongue’s ancient Norse past: a neologism that looks, sounds and behaves like Icelandic.

The Icelandic word for computer, for example, is tölva, a marriage of tala, which means number, and völva, prophetess. A web browser is vafri, derived from the verb to wander.”

Here is the whole article, headlined “Icelandic language battles threat of ‘digital extinction’.” In English.

European Languages in Danger?

Euronews has an article with a nice map of European languages in danger. The map is interactive on the Euronews site, here. Every now and then we hear a story about the rampant death of languages around the world. The news here is that in Europe, at least, languages are largely holding their own. The Euronews article is built around a UNESCO report, which you can view here.

The Apostrophe’s Tale, Continued

Kazakhstan is changing its alphabet. From DuoLingo, here is an example of the old script compared to the new:

Cyrillic: Барлық адамдар тумысынан азат және қадір-қасиеті мен кұқықтары тең болып дүниеге келеді. Адамдарға ақыл-парасат, ар-ождан берілген, сондықтан олар бір-бірімен туыстық, бауырмалдық қарым-қатынас жасаулары тиіс.

New Latin: Barlyq adamdar ty’mysynan azat ja’ne qadir-qasi’yeti men kuqyqtary ten’ bolyp du’ni’ege keledi. Adamdarg’a aqyl-parasat, ar-ojdan berilgen, sondyqtan olar bir-birimen ty’ystyq, bay’yrmaldyq qarym-qatynas jasay’lary ti’is.

The Republic of Kazakhstan (Қазақстан Республикасы) will become Qazaqstan Respy’bli’kasy. Clear as a bell.

I put up this chart of the new Latinized script last November, in a post called Apostrophe Catastrophe. Now, a few months on, reviews of “the fulfillment of the dreams of our ancestors,” according to President Nazarbayev, are starting to come in.  Here’s what people are saying.