Weekend Reading

Here is a selection of fine reading material on which to muse this weekend:

The Fate of Earth by Elizabeth Kolbert in The New Yorker
Russia’s House of Shadows by Joshua Yaffa in The New Yorker
A New History of the First Peoples in the Americas by Adam Rutherford in The Atlantic
Here’s What Would Happen If Donald Trump Nuked North Korea by Greg Fish at Rantt.com
Citizens of anywhere by Matthew Valencia at 1843magazine.com
Ça va un peu by Adam Shatz in the London Review of Books, reviewing Congo: The Epic History of a People by David van Reybrouck

Weekend Reading

Don’t neglect your reading now, you hear? And here are a few suggestions for some fine weekend reading:

A River of Tears by Nancy Macdonald in Maclean’s
The Volcano that Shrouded the Earth by Gillen D’Arcy Wood at Nautilus.com
The best books for Rethinking Economics at Five Books
The Chinese World Order by Andrew J. Nathan at the New York Review of Books
All Beans, No Tomatoes by Rachel Pieh Jones at thesmartset.com

Weekend Reading

Here are a few wild and exotic titles to help you head off on a bold reading safari this weekend.

Trollhättan by Andrew Brown in Granta
My Drowning (And Other Inconveniences) by Tim Cahill at Outside Online
Kurds Need A Street: A (Classical) Liberal Case for Kurdistan by Jonah Cohen in Quillette
If It Keeps on Raining by Micah Fields in Oxford American
The Coming Software Apocalypse by James Somers at TheAtlantic.com
The effects of a single terrorist nuclear bomb by Matthew Bunn at thebulletin.org

Weekend Reading

Here is a celebration of interesting reading for the American holiday weekend:

A series on Why We Travel by Pico Iyer at picoiyerjourneys.com
The Hateful Monk by Gavin Jacobson in the New York Review of Books online
Why Germans Are So Ambivalent About Russia by Daniel Tost at global.handelsblatt.com
How Much More Can We Learn About the Universe by Lawrence M. Krauss in Nautilus
Borderline Insanity: What Does Brexit Mean for Northern Ireland by Jörg Schindler in Spiegel
Glossing Africa by Namwali Serpell in the New York Review of Books online

Plus two most recommendable short fiction books from international authors which will serve you well if you’re lucky enough to have a third day this weekend:

From Norway,  The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen, and
From Sri Lanka, The Story of a Brief Marriage: A Novel by Anuk Arudpragasam

Cheers!

Weekend Reading

Articles I’ve enjoyed this week. Load them on your mobile device and enjoy them at the beach.

A Swap for Zanzibar by Neal Ascherson in the London Review of Books
The Paradox of the Elephant Brain by Suzana Herculano-Houzel at mitp.nautil.us
The Origin Story of Animals Is a Song of Ice and Fire by Ed Yong at theatlantic.com
Once upon a time in 1989 by Slavenka Drakulić at eurozine.com
What to Expect When You’re Expecting Zapad 2017 by Michael Kofman at War on the Rocks
Understanding Moscow: The Mysteries of the Russian Mindset by Christian Neef at Spiegel
This Pacific Island Is Caught in a Global Power Struggle (And It’s Not Guam) by Daniel Lin at nationalgeographic.com

Weekend Reading

A few interesting articles to enjoy with your favorite beverage this weekend:

A Total Solar Eclipse Feels Really Weird by Bob Berman in Wired
The End of “Here and Now” by Alexandra Samuel in JSTOR Daily
The Omnipresence of Dust in Kathmandu by Abby Seiff at psmag.com
Will Russia Interfere In The Finnish Presidential Election by Pekka Virkki in Up North magazine
How to kill a dinosaur in 10 minutes by Paul Braterman at 3quarksdaily
The Haunted Mind: The Stubborn Persistence of the Supernatural by Bo Winegard and Ben Winegard at quillette.com

Weekend Reading

Possible poolside reading for your weekend:
 
How Eclipse Chasers Are Putting a Small Kentucky Town on the Map by Lucas Reilly at Mental Floss
The G20 in an Unjust World by Alexander Jung at Spiegel
Racing the Storm: The Story of the Mobile Bay Sailing Disaster by Matthew Teague at Smithsonian
The man who went on a hike – and never stopped walking by Robert Moor in The Guardian
Monocle’s View From Nowhere by Kyle Chayka in The New Republic